Through the Looking Glass

Gabriel - 19 - Bacchanae - Oxytocin - ATP - Fire Nation - M.A.W

Intelligence

It is a very common claim from young people to say that they’re “intelligent” or that they’re too “intelligent” for that job.

A very important distinction must be made. Intelligence is a tool. A carpenter is not hired because he has a hammer. He’s hired for how he uses that hammer to produce amazing creations.

We are not hired because of our intelligence. It’s how we use our intelligence that allows us to get the job.

amandaonwriting:

Writers can use these 12 Archetypes to create characters
The 12 Common Archetypes by Carl Golden
The twelve archetypes are divided into ego types, self types, and soul types. 
1) The Four Ego Types 1. The InnocentMotto: Free to be you and meCore desire: to get to paradiseGoal: to be happyGreatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrongStrategy: to do things rightWeakness: boring for all their naive innocenceTalent: faith and optimismThe Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer. 2. The Orphan/Regular Guy or GalMotto: All men and women are created equalCore Desire: connecting with othersGoal: to belongGreatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowdStrategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touchWeakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationshipsTalent: realism, empathy, lack of pretenceThe Regular Person is also known as: The good old boy, everyman, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbour, the silent majority. 3. The HeroMotto: Where there’s a will, there’s a wayCore desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous actsGoal: expert mastery in a way that improves the worldGreatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken”Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possibleWeakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fightTalent: competence and courageThe Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player. 4. The CaregiverMotto: Love your neighbour as yourselfCore desire: to protect and care for othersGoal: to help othersGreatest fear: selfishness and ingratitudeStrategy: doing things for othersWeakness: martyrdom and being exploitedTalent: compassion, generosityThe Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter. 2) The Four Soul Types         5. The ExplorerMotto: Don’t fence me inCore desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the worldGoal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling lifeBiggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptinessStrategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredomWeakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfitTalent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soulThe explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim. 6. The RebelMotto: Rules are made to be brokenCore desire: revenge or revolutionGoal: to overturn what isn’t workingGreatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectualStrategy: disrupt, destroy, or shockWeakness: crossing over to the dark side, crimeTalent: outrageousness, radical freedomThe Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast. 7. The LoverMotto: You’re the only oneCore desire: intimacy and experienceGoal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they loveGreatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unlovedStrategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractiveWeakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identityTalent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitmentThe Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder. 8. The CreatorMotto: If you can imagine it, it can be doneCore desire: to create things of enduring valueGoal: to realize a visionGreatest fear: mediocre vision or executionStrategy: develop artistic control and skillTask: to create culture, express own visionWeakness: perfectionism, bad solutionsTalent: creativity and imaginationThe Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer. 3) The Four Self Types 9. The JesterMotto: You only live onceCore desire: to live in the moment with full enjoymentGoal: to have a great time and lighten up the worldGreatest fear: being bored or boring othersStrategy: play, make jokes, be funnyWeakness: frivolity, wasting timeTalent: joyThe Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian. 10. The SageMotto: The truth will set you freeCore desire: to find the truth.Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world.Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance.Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes.Weakness: can study details forever and never act.Talent: wisdom, intelligence.The Sage is also known as: The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative. 11. The MagicianMotto: I make things happen.Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universeGoal: to make dreams come trueGreatest fear: unintended negative consequencesStrategy: develop a vision and live by itWeakness: becoming manipulativeTalent: finding win-win solutionsThe Magician is also known as: The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man. 12. The RulerMotto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.Core desire: controlGoal: create a prosperous, successful family or communityStrategy: exercise powerGreatest fear: chaos, being overthrownWeakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegateTalent: responsibility, leadershipThe Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator.
Note: There are four cardinal orientations: freedom, social, ego, order. The types have a place on these orientations.
Article via soulcraft.co

amandaonwriting:

Writers can use these 12 Archetypes to create characters

The 12 Common Archetypes by Carl Golden

The twelve archetypes are divided into ego types, self types, and soul types. 

1) The Four Ego Types
 
1. The Innocent
Motto: Free to be you and me
Core desire: to get to paradise
Goal: to be happy
Greatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrong
Strategy: to do things right
Weakness: boring for all their naive innocence
Talent: faith and optimism
The Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer.
 
2. The Orphan/Regular Guy or Gal
Motto: All men and women are created equal
Core Desire: connecting with others
Goal: to belong
Greatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowd
Strategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touch
Weakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationships
Talent: realism, empathy, lack of pretence
The Regular Person is also known as: The good old boy, everyman, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbour, the silent majority.
 
3. The Hero
Motto: Where there’s a will, there’s a way
Core desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous acts
Goal: expert mastery in a way that improves the world
Greatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken”
Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possible
Weakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fight
Talent: competence and courage
The Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player.
 
4. The Caregiver
Motto: Love your neighbour as yourself
Core desire: to protect and care for others
Goal: to help others
Greatest fear: selfishness and ingratitude
Strategy: doing things for others
Weakness: martyrdom and being exploited
Talent: compassion, generosity
The Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter.
 
2) The Four Soul Types
         
5. The Explorer
Motto: Don’t fence me in
Core desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world
Goal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life
Biggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptiness
Strategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredom
Weakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfit
Talent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soul
The explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim.
 
6. The Rebel
Motto: Rules are made to be broken
Core desire: revenge or revolution
Goal: to overturn what isn’t working
Greatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectual
Strategy: disrupt, destroy, or shock
Weakness: crossing over to the dark side, crime
Talent: outrageousness, radical freedom
The Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast.
 
7. The Lover
Motto: You’re the only one
Core desire: intimacy and experience
Goal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they love
Greatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unloved
Strategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractive
Weakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identity
Talent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitment
The Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder.
 
8. The Creator
Motto: If you can imagine it, it can be done
Core desire: to create things of enduring value
Goal: to realize a vision
Greatest fear: mediocre vision or execution
Strategy: develop artistic control and skill
Task: to create culture, express own vision
Weakness: perfectionism, bad solutions
Talent: creativity and imagination
The Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer.
 
3) The Four Self Types
 
9. The Jester
Motto: You only live once
Core desire: to live in the moment with full enjoyment
Goal: to have a great time and lighten up the world
Greatest fear: being bored or boring others
Strategy: play, make jokes, be funny
Weakness: frivolity, wasting time
Talent: joy
The Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian.
 
10. The Sage
Motto: The truth will set you free
Core desire: to find the truth.
Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world.
Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance.
Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes.
Weakness: can study details forever and never act.
Talent: wisdom, intelligence.
The Sage is also known as: The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative.
 
11. The Magician
Motto: I make things happen.
Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universe
Goal: to make dreams come true
Greatest fear: unintended negative consequences
Strategy: develop a vision and live by it
Weakness: becoming manipulative
Talent: finding win-win solutions
The Magician is also known as: The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man.
 
12. The Ruler
Motto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.
Core desire: control
Goal: create a prosperous, successful family or community
Strategy: exercise power
Greatest fear: chaos, being overthrown
Weakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegate
Talent: responsibility, leadership
The Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator.

Note: There are four cardinal orientations: freedom, social, ego, order. The types have a place on these orientations.

Article via soulcraft.co

(via insanewordcount)

It’s been a while since I’ve sat here and spoken about my thoughts and feelings.
Lately this has been all I’ve been wanting to do, but I couldn’t find the right words.
Ever since my late teenage years, I’ve only been concerned about myself. I didn’t care about the people closest to me, or the implications for them due to my actions.
It’s sad to say it, but I am disappointed with what I was.

I wish I realised this sooner, but compared to many others, I’m one of the lucky ones who realised before it was too late.
It’s completely understandable. We go through high school being told that nothing mattered except for what YOU did and what YOU wanna do. So we adapt a similar idea to the rest of our lives.

We go through uni and make friends. They enjoy partying. They don’t care much about academia. So you follow a similar doctrine. You don’t want to be left out.
You notice that your friends don’t talk about their families, so you don’t either. Soon, you spend less time with your family and more time with your friends.

After the 3 or so years at uni, you graduate and you’re looking for a job. You look for employment near where you live, near your significant other and near your friends. You don’t even think about looking for a job near your family. No one does. You’re not the only one.

Eight years into your position, you choose to buy your first home. It’s convenient. It’s new. It’s built near work. You love it. You invite your friends and colleagues over for drinks.

One year later, you get a phonecall from an unknown number. One of your parents have passed away. The person calling was a doctor at your parents’ local hospital.

From here, you feel like your world is about to fall apart. You’re a few months off 30, and you’ve lost one of your closest family members.
You’ve been so caught up with your life and career that you forgot about everything else.

Don’t forget about everything else. In a society where we study and work to build up our lives, we need to always remember to put aside some time to see the ones we care about. Your family are the ones that brought you to this moment of your life. Without them, you wouldn’t be who you are. Be thankful of that.

It’s taken me 20 years to realise this, but I love my parents and I don’t want to lose them or neglect the friendship with them.
I don’t care what the impact is on my career; I’m spending as much time as I can with my family, and so should you.

It’s “to-mah-to” not “to-mah-to”

Speech is the only true freedom one has in a somewhat authoritarian society. So it sickens and irritates me when someone is corrected for sentence structure and articulation.
Language is a dynamic state. It is constantly changing. We innovate it to suit our needs. It will never be the same.
If we take a person’s freedom of speech away from them, we are taking away the most basic form of self-identity. We are taking away their right to be unique.

houseofalexzander:

Lustrous.

A man in the grocery store line today approached me and said, “Sir, when I first saw you I was extremely attracted to you, but then I noticed that you are a boy. How… I mean, why do you dress so provocatively?”

I responded, “Well, in today’s world the majority of the straight male race view women as objects, or something that belongs to them. I dress provocatively because it attracts the attention of men in a sexual and OBJECTIVE way. However, when realized that I am actually male, they often become confused, disgusted, upset or all of the above. By inflicting this minor emotional damaged upon the ego of a man raised by twisted societal gender norms, maybe, just maybe the individual will think twice before viewing another woman with an objective attitude and sense of belonging. No woman, belongs to ANYONE. Male or female, the equality of human beings needs to be a priority. It is something worth dressing up for.”

I AM NOT KIDDING. The woman behind me, the female cashier, the old lady bagging groceries and the woman in front of me who was talking on the phone STOPPED, …. and proceeded to gasp and clap. The man shook my hand, told me to have a blessed day and then said, “excuse me ladies, I need to visit my daughter.”

…. I was shaking by the time I walked out of the store.

- Elliott Alexzander

(via sirsalacious)

Is there anyone out there who’s clean, funny, respectful and fucking loves cuddles? I want you as a housemate!

Whenever I mimic an Australian accent, I have a mental image of Hercules Hansen saying, “We can either sit here and do nothing, or grab those flare guns and do something really stupid.”

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is eight years old, she’s got pink cheeks that her grandmother calls chubby. She wants a second cookie but her aunt says “you’ll get huge if you keep eating.” She wants a dress and the woman in the changing room says “she’ll probably need a large in that.” She wants to have dessert and her waiter says “After all that dinner you just had? You must be really hungry!” and her parents laugh.

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is eleven and she is picked second-to-last in gym class. She watches a cartoon and sees that everyone who is annoying is drawn with a big wide body, all sweaty and panting. At night she dreams she is swelling like the ocean over seabeds. When she wakes up, she skips school.

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is thirteen and her friends are stick-thin ballerinas with valleys between their hipbones. She is instead developing the wide curves of her mother. She says she is thick but her friends argue that she’s “muscular” and for some reason this hurts worse than just admitting that she jiggles when she walks and she’ll never be a dancer. Eating seconds of anything feels like she’s breaking some unspoken rule. The word “indulgent” starts to go along with “food.”

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is fourteen and she has stopped drinking soda and juice because they bloat you. She always takes the stairs. She fidgets when she has to sit still. Whenever she goes out for ice cream, she leaves half at the bottom - but someone else always leaves more and she feels like she’s falling. She pretends to like salad more than she does. She feels eyes burrowing through her body while she eats lunch. Kate Moss tells her nothing tastes as good as skinny feels, but she just feels like she is wilting.

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is fifteen the first time her father says “you’re getting gaunt.” She rolls her eyes. She eats one meal a day but thinks she stays the same size. Every time she picks up a brownie she thinks of the people she sees on t.v. and every time she has cake, she thinks of the one million magazine articles on restricting calories. She used to have no idea a flat stomach was supposed to be beautiful until she saw advice on how to achieve it. She cuts back on everything. She controls. They tell her she’s getting too thin but she doesn’t believe it.

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is sixteen and tearing herself into shreds in order for a thigh gap big enough to hush the screams in her head. She doesn’t “indulge,” ever. She can’t go out with friends, they expect her to eat. She damns her sweet tooth directly to hell. It’s coffee for breakfast and tea for lunch and if there’s dance that evening, two cups of water and then maybe an apple. She lies all the time until she thinks the words will rot her teeth. She dreams about food when she sleeps. Her aunt begs her to eat anything, even just a small cookie. They say, “One bite won’t make you fat, will it, darling?”

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is seventeen and too sick to go to prom because she can’t stand up for very long. She thinks she wouldn’t look good in a dress anyway. Her nails are blue and not because they are painted. Her hair is too thin to do anything with. She’s tired all the time and always distracted. She once absently mentions the caloric value of grapes to the boy she is with and he looks at her like she’s gone insane and in that moment she realizes most people don’t have numbers constantly scrolling in their heads. She swallows hard and tries to figure out where it all went wrong, why more than a granola bar for a meal makes her feel sick, why she tastes disease and courts with death. She misses sleep. She misses being able to dream. She misses being herself instead of just being empty.

A FAT LITTLE GIRL
is twenty and writes poetry and is a healthy weight and still fights down the voices every single day. She puts food in her mouth and sometimes cries about it but more and more often feels good, feels balanced. Her cheeks are pink and they are chubby and soft and no longer growing slight fur. Her hair is long and it is beautiful. She still picks herself apart in the mirror, but she’s starting to get better about it. She wears the dress she likes even if it only fits her in a large and she doesn’t feel like a failure for it. She is falling in love with the fat on her hips.

She is eating out with friends and not worrying about finding the lowest calorie item on the menu when she hears a mother tell her four year old daughter “You can’t have ice cream, we just had dinner.
You don’t want to end up as a fat little girl.”

Why do we constantly do this to our children? /// r.i.d  (via hi-im-eating)

(via hybridcomplex)

I was asked by a colleague, “What is it that makes you most unhappy?”
I looked at him, thought about it momentarily and said, “Every person I’ve met whom I don’t wish to speak to anymore. They’ve all caused some form of grief for me, and the thought of them makes me unhappy.” 

to fight monsters we created monsters of our own.

(Source: wintersoldierrs)